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Post-apocalypse - Apocalypse On The Set - Nine ...


Here are my nine favorite (or most-anticipated, in one case) queer YA post-apocalyptic books. Some of them take place in the aftermath of our actual world, while some take place in the aftermath of another or an alternate world.




Post-apocalypse - Apocalypse on the Set - Nine ...



A scientist is ordered by his dictator to create a robot in the apparent name of progress, and so the scientist creates the B.R.A.I.N., a highly intelligent robot. The dictator seizes it upon its apparent completion and turns it into the Fabrication Machine, an armature that can construct an army of war machines to destroy the dictator's enemies. However, the B.R.A.I.N. became corrupted because it lacked a soul, causing it to exterminate humanity. On the verge of destruction, the scientist uses alchemy to create nine homunculus-like rag dolls known as "Stitchpunks" as a last resort to stopping the machines, giving them portions of his own soul via a talisman he created. He dies upon completion of the final doll.


The film soundtrack was released only on iTunes[12] and on Amazon nine days before the film was released. It includes the themes created by Danny Elfman, Deborah Lurie's film score, and "Welcome Home" by Coheed and Cambria. The latter song was used in two trailers for the film, with minor censoring for the full song in the soundtrack. Along with "Welcome Home", the teaser trailer also features an excerpt from "The Captain" by The Knife, which was also not included in the soundtrack. Other songs within the film that were not included in the soundtrack was the traditional "Dies Irae" chant, performed by Crispin Glover as part of the background score, and "Over the Rainbow", the song from The Wizard of Oz and performed by Judy Garland. The song plays in a lighthearted scene when the surviving stitchpunks were celebrating the destruction of the factory and played it on a 78rpm phonograph record.


9 is the second animated feature film to be released by Focus Features, the first being Coraline, written and directed by Henry Selick and based on the book by Neil Gaiman. The trailer for 9 preceded Coraline when it was shown in theaters and released on DVD. A second trailer for 9 first appeared on G4's Attack of the Show and was later shown before Land of the Lost. It is an extensive trailer which includes a bit of the background story behind the existence of the creations. In April 2009, the film's "Scientist" began making journal entries on a Facebook page called "9 Scientist", including essays about each of his nine creations. The "9 Scientist" Facebook page seemingly references events leading up to the release of the film.[14] A viral campaign promotional website for 9 was launched. It shed some light upon the background of the 9 world.[15] The trailer featured several machines: the Cat Beast, a catlike ambush predator that appeared in the original short film; the Winged Beast, a pterodactyl-style machine with movable blades in its mouth; the Seamstress, a hypnotic serpent; Steel War Behemoths, large two-legged machines armed with a machine gun and poison gas missiles which can kill in a matter of seconds; the Fabrication Machine (previously known as B.R.A.I.N.), a cyclopean, spiderlike machine with many multi-jointed arms; and Seekers, aerial machines with searchlights.[13] Later trailers also reveal the existence of several small spiderlike machines. Part of the film's marketing strategy was its release date of September 9, 2009 ("9/9/09").


In AMC's "The Walking Dead" (which airs Sundays at 9 p.m. EST/8 p.m. CST), now in its ninth season, characters have survived years after the zombie apocalypse began and are now working to expand their simple communities into a stronger, more capable and civilized society.


People who were born after the apocalypse, like Judith and Hershel in "The Walking Dead," have no knowledge of what life was like prior to the apocalypse and therefore no vision of what life could be like in the future if that knowledge isn't shared.


Because it's a modern-day apocalypse, the characters in "The Walking Dead" probably have a very basic idea of how to take care of themselves. But the average person's common-sense notion of health is still pretty poor, Lipo said. Specialized care would be critical for survival.


In times like these, it can feel like the world is truly in the midst of an apocalypse. Hidden away in our homes and cut off from any significant contact with our loved ones only makes it feel like normal life is further and further out of our reach. But fear not, we can weather this storm and cultivate a new normal in the meantime. After all, love is capable of anything.


"Each episode has its own distinct tone and point of view -- but the stakes are high in each story, pushing new, indelible characters with relentless, life-threatening choices and situations," AMC explains. "We get to see the apocalypse through different eyes, discovering more worlds, mythos, and mysteries of the Walking Dead."


Digital artist TDRAW specializes in artificial intelligence-generated art that explores fantastical worlds. One of his recently completed pieces depicts a cityscape from science fiction in nine different parts which, when put together, reveals another work of art: a silhouette resembling the portrait of the Mona Lisa.


That's the question at the heart of post apocalyptic romance books. In these stories, the apocalypse is just the beginning. The real adventure is what comes after, as survivors band together and rebuild society in the aftermath.


In the years following 9/11, American TV developed a preoccupation with apocalypse. Science fiction and fantasy shows ranging from Firefly to Heroes, from the rebooted Battlestar Galactica to Lost, envisaged scenarios in which world-changing disasters were either threatened or actually took place. During the same period numerous commentators observed that the American media's representation of gender had undergone a marked regression, possibly, it was suggested, as a consequence of the 9/11 attacks and the feelings of weakness and insecurity they engendered in the nation's men.Eve Bennett investigates whether the same impulse to return to traditional images of masculinity and femininity can be found in the contemporary cycle of apocalyptic series, programmes which, like 9/11 itself, present plenty of opportunity for narratives of damsels-in-distress and heroic male rescuers. However, as this book shows, whether such narratives play out in the expected manner is another matter.


Netflix's original series Black Summer is the companion show to Z Nation, and follows a mother separated from her daughter at the start of a zombie apocalypse, chronicling her desperate attempt to reunite with her child. Jaime King stars in the lead role as Rose, who joins forces on her journey with a small group of refugees navigating the new world.


It was a normal school day at a Korean high school until a student returns from the school's science lab infected by an unknown virus. As the infection spreads out of the school and throughout the peninsula, the military desperately interrogates the psychotic science teacher who started it all, while his students struggle to survive until help arrives. All of Us Are Dead is a brand-new South Korean coming-of-age zombie apocalypse horror streaming series.


Of all the colours Kayleeanne Sweeney (pictured, left) could have chosen to wear to court during the past few weeks, pink was surely the most distasteful. Pink has been worn by Olivia Pratt-Korbel's (pictured, bottom right) family in memory of their beloved little girl ever since her tragic death seven months ago. Pink was the colour of the nine-year-old's coffin. It is hard to imagine, then, what her killer's girlfriend was thinking, as she swaggered around Manchester Crown Court in a belted coat in the very same shade, her cosmetically-inflated lips fixed in a defiant pout. If it was an attempt to garner sympathy, then it was horribly misjudged. Instead, the 34-year-old's carefully curated outfit; that 350 Ted Baker coat, 50s-style sunglasses, handbag dangling from one forearm and immaculately highlighted and blow-dried hair served as a timely reminder of the financial rewards of being Cashman's lifelong partner and the mother of his children - the proverbial gangster's moll. 041b061a72


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